download Textbooks The Illustrated A Brief History of Time/The Universe in a Nutshell Author Stephen Hawking – Selindameditasyon.com

The Illustrated A Brief History of Time/The Universe in a Nutshell These books are still pretty hard to follow especially the History of Time but the illustrations do help a lot I think the big problem is that the math helps you understand, and most people reading the book don t have the math skills required to follow it My math is a bit rusty, but i still think it would help me to have an appendix or something showing the mathematical support for the ideas Maybe not, but without it the discussions seem almost like fantasy. Some nice updates since the publication of Brief History of Time, which I loved, but not much here for those of us looking for some satisfying extension of his earlier primer on theoretical physics His treatment of string theory piqued my curiosity, but ultimately led me to check out Brian Greene s Elegant Universe for aextensive treatment of string theory I m reading that now, and I m seeing that Greene is a little better at finding the best metaphors for elucidating abstractions like t Some nice updates since the publication of Brief History of Time, which I loved, but not much here for those of us looking for some satisfying extension of his earlier primer on theoretical physics His treatment of string theory piqued my curiosity, but ultimately led me to check out Brian Greene s Elegant Universe for aextensive treatment of string theory I m reading that now, and I m seeing that Greene is a little better at finding the best metaphors for elucidating abstractions like these Didn t like the computer generated graphics that served as illustrations Really I read this because the library didn t have his newest book called The Grand Design Disappointments aside, Hawking does have a gift for explaining these theories and their bizarre implications for the general reader I can t imagine anyone less trained than myself to grasp the science behind these concepts fortunately, no background in upper math or physics is presupposed What I get is an almost dizzying sense of awe and wonder and, yes, giddiness over the mind bending, trippy, conceptual gymnastics Hawking presents One of the most influential thinkers of our time, Stephen Hawking is an intellectual icon, known not only for the adventurousness of his ideas but for the clarity and wit with which he expresses them In this new book Hawking takes us to the cutting edge of theoretical physics, where truth is often stranger than fiction, to explain in laymen s terms the principles that control our universe Like many in the community of theoretical physicists, Professor Hawking is seeking to uncover the grail of science the elusive Theory of Everything that lies at the heart of the cosmos In his accessible and often playful style, he guides us on his search to uncover the secrets of the universe from supergravity to supersymmetry, from quantum theory to M theory, from holography to duality He takes us to the wild frontiers of science, where superstring theory and p branes may hold the final clue to the puzzle And he lets us behind the scenes of one of his most exciting intellectual adventures as he seeks to combine Einstein s General Theory of Relativity and Richard Feynman s idea of multiple histories into one complete unified theory that will describe everything that happens in the universe With characteristic exuberance, Professor Hawking invites us to be fellow travelers on this extraordinary voyage through space time Copious four color illustrations help clarify this journey into a surreal wonderland where particles, sheets, and strings move in eleven dimensions where black holes evaporate and disappear, taking their secret with them and where the original cosmic seed from which our own universe sprang was a tiny nut The Universe in a Nutshell is essential reading for all of us who want to understand the universe in which we live Like its companion volume, A Brief History of Time, it conveys the excitement felt within the scientific community as the secrets of the cosmos reveal themselves There s a reason I never took physicsAnd that all of my science credits for my BA consist of studying the biographies of Copernicus, Galileo, and Einstein.This stuff is COMPLICATED, y alls.I read Brief History of Time in high school as an assignment for Non western Civilization from one of the best teachers I ever had Still not sure how the assignment tied in with the class but I suppose that s neither here nor there It was something that always stuck with me and when I saw the opportunity There s a reason I never took physicsAnd that all of my science credits for my BA consist of studying the biographies of Copernicus, Galileo, and Einstein.This stuff is COMPLICATED, y alls.I read Brief History of Time in high school as an assignment for Non western Civilization from one of the best teachers I ever had Still not sure how the assignment tied in with the class but I suppose that s neither here nor there It was something that always stuck with me and when I saw the opportunity to buy an illustrated version coupled with a second book by Hawking for super cheap at my Borders closing sale, I snatched it up.In both books, Dr Hawking explains amazingly complex concepts in an easily comprehensible if not necessarily understandable way which seems to break things down as simply as possible On it s own, I would give Brief History 5 Stars The book starts with a fairly clear thesis and moves step by step describing all the points it intended to hit And the illustrations are a nice bonus It should be noted that this text was updated from the original version published in the late 80 s I m not sure if it differs any from the version I read in the late 90 s but there definitely seemed to be a few concepts I don t recall from the first time around But over all, Brief History is pretty understandable, and eye opening once you can wrap your mind around the concepts involved.Perhaps part of the problem comparing the two books is that relativity as a theory is over 100 years old It seems to be something that most averagely not a word I know educated people have a basic grasp up, so the elaborations in Brief History are easier to follow Then the book gets into string theory Which I seem to recall understanding once upon a time Kinda And then the second book elaborates on that, and moves from there to branes and ten dimensional space and imaginary time and a whole lot of muchmodern theory is thrown at you all at once Plus, Hawking acknowledges in the prologue to Universe in a Nutshell that he conceived that book as one that has,or less, stand alone chapters which refer to each other but don t build a story flow as it were There s a whole lot going on in that book and a lot of it, even if I read it over a few times, flew right over my head Though a part of me feels I could really grasp everything it discusses if I push myself to struggle through a reread.And maybe in about 5 10 years I ll feel up to it I m keeping the book so it ll always be on the shelf And I ll willingly admit, perhaps it s not fair to not give this book a full 5 star rating based on my own ignorance and inability to understand what seems like the easiest explanation of very complicated ideas But as I said beforethis stuff is COM PLI CATED This book is gorgeous Let s get that out of the way The illustrations and photos go a long way to engage the reader in a way that draws them further into the subject The language is accessible for anyone who might be interested in reading Often science books use language that seems to want to repel people from being interested in the subject it s discussing where with this book, you get the sense that Hawking really wants people, and children to learn and understand the concepts that he s ex This book is gorgeous Let s get that out of the way The illustrations and photos go a long way to engage the reader in a way that draws them further into the subject The language is accessible for anyone who might be interested in reading Often science books use language that seems to want to repel people from being interested in the subject it s discussing where with this book, you get the sense that Hawking really wants people, and children to learn and understand the concepts that he s explaining A lot has been made out of intelligence and how children who don t understand or are interested in science or mathematics are not intelligent, where in reality we have to consider how the subject are being explained to them, and reevaluate how differently people perceive the world around them and learn One size does not fit all And yet, this book is a joy to read I love taking one chapter at a time, and I don t feel like I m reading an academic book at all Science becomes an art, like fiction, interesting and marvelous Granted, I always did enjoy science, but I think everyone enjoys science There isn t a person on the face of the planet that isn t curious about the world they live in and how it works I can t wait to hand this book over to my children when they re a little older, and just watch it get read over and over again One of the greatest minds, a reminder that it s easy to dismiss someone based on their ability to communicate or their disadvantages I work in a Neuro theatre and often deal with people who due to illness or injury find it hard to respond, wonder how they feel I treated them.As for the book, love science and find black holes fascinating even if I had to read the book several times to understand exactly what professor Hawking meant. This was way harder to read than I would ve thought, being a worldwide popular science bestseller It s probable that most people bought that book and just kept it on their coffee table to impress visitors Some stuff about black holes and the life of the universe simply blew my mind In the later chapters, I had a hard time distinguishing proper science form boundless speculations, but I guess that s the state of the art in quantum physics meeting general relativity whew Other chapters ma This was way harder to read than I would ve thought, being a worldwide popular science bestseller It s probable that most people bought that book and just kept it on their coffee table to impress visitors Some stuff about black holes and the life of the universe simply blew my mind In the later chapters, I had a hard time distinguishing proper science form boundless speculations, but I guess that s the state of the art in quantum physics meeting general relativity whew Other chapters made me wish I was smarter, or at least better to envision n dimensional objects Call me Codename pea brain nerdy joke Life, the universe, and everything We know the answer 42 , but have we learned to ask the question In these two books, conveniently collected into one exceedingly well produced volume, Stephen Hawking sets forth the fundamental thinking underlying modern cosmology From this vantage point, he also probes some of those deeper questions which naturally follow from the empirical study The first of the selections is A Brief History of Time, Hawking s bestselling primer on astrophysics Though t Life, the universe, and everything We know the answer 42 , but have we learned to ask the question In these two books, conveniently collected into one exceedingly well produced volume, Stephen Hawking sets forth the fundamental thinking underlying modern cosmology From this vantage point, he also probes some of those deeper questions which naturally follow from the empirical study The first of the selections is A Brief History of Time, Hawking s bestselling primer on astrophysics Though the title would suggest, well, a history book, the possible origins of the universe occupy only a portion of the discussion Hawking first lays out the scientific developments which culminated in those theories, detailing the changes from Ptolemy s geocentric model to Newtonian mechanics to the revolutionary discoveries made at the start of the 20th century Of these latter two in particular are of great interest Einstein s general theory of relativity, which relates to the gravitational interactions of objects on an astronomical scale, and quantum mechanics, the formulas developed by Heisenberg and his colleagues at Copenhagen to explain the interactions of subatomic particles Both theories completely overthrew the conventional wisdom which had preceded them, both agree to a high degree of accuracy with empirical observation and both are mutually exclusive to the other These two theories are known to be inconsistent with each other, Hawking writes, they cannot both be correct He goes on to state that one of the main goals of contemporary physics is the search for a quantum theory of gravity that will resolve the inherent contradictions between the two With these tools of the trade, incomplete though they are, in hand, Hawking then does turn his attention to their implications on the origin and development of the universe Much of the discussion centers around singularities termination points on the space time continuum at which infinite density results in infinite temperature, the cessation of time, and a complete breakdown of all known laws of science Hawking handles two examples localized instances of the phenomenon resulting from the collapse of large stars, termed black holes, and the postulated explosion by which the universe might have begun the Big Bang In treating this last, he is careful to point out that though our current understanding of the laws of physics might take us right up the moment of the Bang, they are rendered meaningless at the singularity itself and thus we cannot speak scientifically about what might have come before if the notion of time would even still apply or speculate as to possible causes But Hawking also introduces another possibility, that there might be no beginning singularity at all In this case, space time could be viewed as a finite, unbounded expanse, like the surface of a ball but in four dimensions instead of three Thus, the universe had no beginning, no moment of creation, and by implication, no creator While difficult to imagine, the math apparently is plausible, and while Hawking doesn t explicitly endorse this view, he does give it serious consideration In The Universe in a Nutshell, Hawking continues his discussion of advanced physics studies and their implications on the observable world Having laid the foundations in the previous book, here he tackles a number of topics, from string theory to time travel, in chapters than can be reador less independently Collected as the two are here in one volume, Universe readslike a set of extended appendices to Brief History, which probably aids comprehension as well as presentation The information presented, though informative and interesting, doesn t have the same impact as those fundamental principles handled in the former work Nevertheless, the latter does provide a primer to several trendy topics as well as provide ammunition for a few good physics puns braaaaaaaanes , and thus is worth at least a glance The modular nature of the discussion makes skimming easy, if that happens to be one s aim Hawking s prose is consistent throughout both volumes, lucid and engaging and liberally sprinkled with humor The narrative will move, mostly seamlessly, from scientific explication to philosophical speculation, but is never didactic in the first case and never dogmatic in the second Though easy to read and follow Brief History contains just one equation guess which one , this conversational tone does have its drawbacks Hawking s work is an excellent introduction for the layman, but has less to offer the acolyte Those who have studied physics at the university level will find the collection a good refresher, but not plumbing any uncharted waters Another detriment stems from the lack of mathematical proofs Hawking s conclusions must of necessity be taken for granted While most of the fundamental theories discussed are universally accepted, many of the conjectures the author makes are not, and without being able to consider the step by step reasoning the reader must simply take them on faith I understand the reasoning here the book is a primer, not a college text but I did find myself wishing some of the sweeping claims were givensupport That being said, both of those complaints can be rectified by further study, and Hawking does provide a long list of references For what it is an introduction to the problems and theories that shape modern physics Hawking s work succeeds admirably I highly recommend that anyone wishing to tackle the subject start with this particular edition ISBN 978 0 307 29122 6 Not only do you get two books in one, but the whole volume is filled with charts and diagrams that illustrate otherwise difficult to picture concepts Whatever one s worldview might be, the questions of the origin and design of the universe must be a central component, and the contributions of modern science to the discussion cannot be ignored This volume is an excellent way to dive into that discussion Both books back to back was a good thing While the second was decidedly less mathematical than the first, it helped that all the complicated ideas or, rather, numerous theories were all fresh in my head A Brief History of Time is stuff that can be introduced by a zillion TV documentaries nowadays, of course, but the benefit of the book is that it explains exactly why we know so much of what we know This can, and frequently does, involve some higher thinking, which Stephen does an admirable Both books back to back was a good thing While the second was decidedly less mathematical than the first, it helped that all the complicated ideas or, rather, numerous theories were all fresh in my head A Brief History of Time is stuff that can be introduced by a zillion TV documentaries nowadays, of course, but the benefit of the book is that it explains exactly why we know so much of what we know This can, and frequently does, involve some higher thinking, which Stephen does an admirable job of dumbing down for us He also takes us on the journey of scientific discovery through the ages, introducing great thinkers and explorers of every era, their triumphs, hits and misses, to show us where we are today, what we know, and why But there s a great, great many aspects to our world and even universe that are understood and explained with a better answer than simply, because The depth and breadth of knowledge imparted by these two companion books is extraordinary and simply cannot be summed up shortly It truly takes someone like Stephen Hawking to condense the universe into a nutshell He does so with tremendous power, clarity, andthan a little humor Stephen Hawking is a brilliant man whose greatest contribution to society is not his science, but his ability to write about difficult concepts in simple language His sense of humor is greatly appreciated Hawking makes learning fun


About the Author: Stephen Hawking

Stephen William Hawking was born on 8 January 1942 in Oxford, England His parents house was in north London, but during the second world war Oxford was considered a safer place to have babies When he was eight, his family moved to St Albans, a town about 20 miles north of London At eleven Stephen went to St Albans School, and then on to University College, Oxford, his father s old college Stephen wanted to do Mathematics, although his father would have preferred medicine Mathematics was not available at University College, so he did Physics instead After three years and not very much work he was awarded a first class honours degree in Natural Science.Stephen then went on to Cambridge to do research in Cosmology, there being no one working in that area in Oxford at the time His supervisor was Denis Sciama, although he had hoped to get Fred Hoyle who was working in Cambridge After gaining his Ph.D he became first a Research Fellow, and later on a Professorial Fellow at Gonville and Caius College After leaving the Institute of Astronomy in 1973 Stephen came to the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and since 1979 has held the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics The chair was founded in 1663 with money left in the will of the Reverend Henry Lucas, who had been the Member of Parliament for the University It was first held by Isaac Barrow, and then in 1669 by Isaac Newton.Stephen Hawking worked on the basic laws which govern the universe With Roger Penrose he showed that Einstein s General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes These results indicated it was necessary to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory, the other great Scientific development of the first half of the 20th Century One consequence of such a unification that he discovered was that black holes should not be completely black, but should emit radiation and eventually evaporate and disappear Another conjecture is that the universe has no edge or boundary in imaginary time This would imply that the way the universe began was completely determined by the laws of science.His many publications include The Large Scale Structure of Spacetime with G.F.R Ellis, General Relativity An Einstein Centenary Survey, with W Israel, and 300 Years of Gravity, with W Israel Stephen Hawking has three popular books published his best seller A Brief History of Time, Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays and most recently in 2001, The Universe in a Nutshell Professor Hawking received twelve honorary degrees, was awarded the CBE in 1982, and was made a Companion of Honour in 1989 He was the recipient of many awards, medals and prizes and is a Fellow of The Royal Society and a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences.


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