epub pdf The Collector By John Fowles – Selindameditasyon.com

The Collector Fredrick is a clerk and butterfly collector who wins some money that lets him retire Fredrick is lonely and has trouble getting along with others, the only people he really has are his aunt and cousin He watches an art student named Miranda who starts to become his obsession When he suddenly has a lot of free time and money on his hands, his daydreams about Miranda turn dark and he plans to kidnap her and hold her hostage in the cellar of an old cottage he buys until she gets to know him and Fredrick is a clerk and butterfly collector who wins some money that lets him retire Fredrick is lonely and has trouble getting along with others, the only people he really has are his aunt and cousin He watches an art student named Miranda who starts to become his obsession When he suddenly has a lot of free time and money on his hands, his daydreams about Miranda turn dark and he plans to kidnap her and hold her hostage in the cellar of an old cottage he buys until she gets to know him and falls in love with him.I really enjoyed the book personally, I liked the writing style and even though its about something macabre Fowles doesn t make it exploitative or gore y to shock the reader A lot of the focus is on the characters change and development as well as their thought process through out I think it s really well done, both the Fredrick and Miranda parts are distinct and feel like two separate people Everything unfolding the way it does felt so real too, the way Fredrick distances himself from what he s doing and tries to justify it, insisting he doesn t mean to do it until he does it even though everything is being meticulously planned Also Miranda s conflicted feelings over Fredrick and her slow breakdown from living confined and alone I originally read this book because I was listening to last podcast on the left which I recommend to anyone who likes cults or serial killers but isn t sensitive to jokes that may be considered offensive and they mention Leonard Lake being obsessed with the book I checked and there are multiple murders associated with the book and so I just wanted to see what about this book was causing all these people to feel like yes killing is great Anyways the only thing I can come up with is that since the book was published in the 1960s there wasn t as much about sadistic killers or people doing crimes like these out there so it appealed to them and Fowles does such a good job capturing a certain kind of personality in Fredrick that people really identified with it It also gave them a good model of how to escalate to the point of doing things like kidnapping and murdering because really in the book Fredrick just starts off by dreaming about it and it goes from there That s all I ve got because view spoiler Fredrick never really hurts Miranda or forces her to do anything especially at first, he kind of just likes having her hide spoiler so I m not sure why that would inspire Leonard Lake to want a slave that he can use for sex and to take care of the house The author in interviews said that the book is about social class and money and I do see that muchclearly in the book than any message about how its a good idea to kidnap women I m not sure how much I agree with the social commentary though probably because it has been decades since the book has been written I do understand the point that money and idle time given to people can lead to them doing things they might not have otherwise but I don t think the class or money is the problem so much as the person themselves Discover John Fowles compelling classic first novel Short and spare and direct, an intelligent thriller with psychological and social overtones Sunday TimesWithdrawn, uneducated and unloved, Frederick collects butterflies and takes photographs He is obsessed with a beautiful stranger, art student Miranda Coming into unexpected money, he buys a remote Sussex house and calmly abducts Miranda, believing she will grow to love him in timeAlone and desperate, Miranda must struggle to understand her captor if she is to gain her freedom I read this when I was very young Young enough that anything with a sexual connotation was interesting to me Even really perverse deviations like this A collector of butterflies collects a girl and holds her prisoner His deviation is far deeper than merely sex But of course, sex is implied all the time.There are two sorts of kept women, those gold diggers who actively sought it, and those trophy wives who had never planned for it and had been actively courted This is a trophy wife by for I read this when I was very young Young enough that anything with a sexual connotation was interesting to me Even really perverse deviations like this A collector of butterflies collects a girl and holds her prisoner His deviation is far deeper than merely sex But of course, sex is implied all the time.There are two sorts of kept women, those gold diggers who actively sought it, and those trophy wives who had never planned for it and had been actively courted This is a trophy wife by force, not a sex slave but a wife.It s a very original story, writing at it s finest And it s creepy, very very creepy.Thanks to Loederkoningin for inspiring me to write this review.There are a lot of excellent reviews on GR about this book, but in my opinion they all give far too much away The book is like an onion The outside skin, then the world within, layer upon layer And at it s resolution, quite unexpectedly there is a tiny green shoot Every detail you know about the story or the characters will take away a layer for you 5 star read, a gold five star This is one of those boy meets girl, chloroforms her, throws her in the back of the van and stuffs her in his basement type stories I knew that already and so I was really not expecting to be coshed on the head and chucked down in the basement as well, and tied hands and feet, and gagged, so that all I could hear was the quiet reasonable voice of working class loner Fred Clegg, aged 22, explaining how he d fallen in love from afar with the unattainable art student Miranda Grey, since he was m This is one of those boy meets girl, chloroforms her, throws her in the back of the van and stuffs her in his basement type stories I knew that already and so I was really not expecting to be coshed on the head and chucked down in the basement as well, and tied hands and feet, and gagged, so that all I could hear was the quiet reasonable voice of working class loner Fred Clegg, aged 22, explaining how he d fallen in love from afar with the unattainable art student Miranda Grey, since he was much too shy to go up speak to her, the only way he could figure out how to meet her and get her to really see the kind of person he was a good person with proper values, not the upper class idiots she was hanging around with was to chloroform her and stuff her in his basement Normally a lowly clerk could not do any such thing, but Fred had a stroke of luck, he won the modern equivalent of 1.6 million on the football pools 1960s version of the National Lottery so he could ditch his family buy an isolated cottage with a lovely big cellar.Fred explains for 122 pages how attentive to her every whim he was, how this was the gentlest form of kidnapping ever, and aside from the initial drugging throwing in the van and the alas necessary gagging and binding from time to time otherwise she d escape, probably, as she had not yet come to see what a good person with proper values he was all she had to do was express a casual desire for Mozart quartets, caviar and Beaujolais and he would roar off in the van and get it Fred is the sweetest psycho ever The kindest and most attentive He doesn t even want to perform any kind of carnal irregularities with Miranda he thinks that sex before marriage is wrong No slurping and grunting at all Anyway, after 122 pages of this fascinating and truly awful yet completely believable reasonable you would have done the same mad droning, suddenly there s a jump cut we get 150 pages of Miranda retelling the whole story in her secret diary This is nearly the hardest part of the novel to read because Miranda turns out to be a ghastly art snob with a fixation on an old enough to be her father boho painter shagster so one is torn between being horrified at her bleak situation which increasingly looks as if it will not end well I mean, really, when a relationship starts with chloroform and basements it is has probably got off on the wrong foot and being horrified at the seething embarrassments of class and sex and posturing, pomposity and pettiness revealed in these seemingly neverending jottings This is a brilliant stroke by John Fowles and really messes with your mind As does the whole book After that things just go badly This novel was unlike anything I ve read before and the character of Frederick will certainly leave a lasting memory I don t think there s been a character that s made my skin crawl or forced me to talk back shout at a book on so many an occasion well done Fowles I definitely think Book Readers should have this book on their shelf. Impotent sociopath kidnaps beautiful art student Told partly from the sociopath s perspective That s my jam I should have loved this book But something left me cold I suppose it may have been all the bitching and complaining the beautiful art student did in her stupid diary What a helpless twit Not to imply that I d be brave and cunning or anythingif someone kidnapped me In fact, I m pretty sure I d be a helpless twit as well But I ll be goddamned if I d expect anyone to enjoy readi Impotent sociopath kidnaps beautiful art student Told partly from the sociopath s perspective That s my jam I should have loved this book But something left me cold I suppose it may have been all the bitching and complaining the beautiful art student did in her stupid diary What a helpless twit Not to imply that I d be brave and cunning or anythingif someone kidnapped me In fact, I m pretty sure I d be a helpless twit as well But I ll be goddamned if I d expect anyone to enjoy reading the daily chronicles of what a helpless twit I d been.The ending really made me smile, though The creepy ending made it all worthwhile Crazy fucker This novel is over fifty years old , and it holds up very well It is the rudimentary skeleton that is upheld fleshed by current events, given a brain by contemporary writers ad nauseum by CSI, Law and Order, Law and Order SVU, Medium, Criminal Minds et al Though its semi predictable, the end is nonetheless terribly terrific That there are two strands of narrative is sometimes a revelation, sometimes an encumbrance like living through a terrible ordeal not once but twice Both psycholo This novel is over fifty years old , and it holds up very well It is the rudimentary skeleton that is upheld fleshed by current events, given a brain by contemporary writers ad nauseum by CSI, Law and Order, Law and Order SVU, Medium, Criminal Minds et al Though its semi predictable, the end is nonetheless terribly terrific That there are two strands of narrative is sometimes a revelation, sometimes an encumbrance like living through a terrible ordeal not once but twice Both psychological documents are wondrous to behold The Collector is a story we ve seen usurped once and again in multiple films, TV novels I am one in a row of specimens It s when I try to flutter out of line that he hates me I m meant to be dead, pinned, always the same, always beautiful He knows that part of my beauty is being alive, but it s the dead me he wants He wants me living but dead The Collector is the story of Frederick Clegg, an extremely odd and lonely man who also collects butterflies He s obsessed with a middle class art student named Miranda Grey and as he continues admiring her from a distance a plan slowlyI am one in a row of specimens It s when I try to flutter out of line that he hates me I m meant to be dead, pinned, always the same, always beautiful He knows that part of my beauty is being alive, but it s the dead me he wants He wants me living but dead The Collector is the story of Frederick Clegg, an extremely odd and lonely man who also collects butterflies He s obsessed with a middle class art student named Miranda Grey and as he continues admiring her from a distance a plan slowly starts developing in his mind that he would like to have her like one of his butterflies He makes preparations by buying a house out in the country, purchasing assorted objects and things he knows she will need, convinced that if he can only capture her and keep her that she will slowly grow to love him.The first part of the novel was told from Frederick s point of view and it was rather alarming at his thought process In his mind, there is nothing morally wrong with what he intends to do and what he actually ends up doing He recognizes that Miranda is a human being as he takes care of her and provides her everything a human would possibly need, but she s inevitably nothingthan an object or a collectible item to him He doesn t mean to harm her at first however, it s evident that as time progresses, he enjoys having power over her and almost finds humor in her attempts to escape The second part of the novel was told from Miranda s point of view through diary entries that she hides underneath her mattress She writes about G.P often, a man she met and who ended up having a huge impact on her thoughts and ideals To Miranda, G.P was everything she wanted to be and his opinions and thoughts became a set of rules for her At first I had a hard time determining the relevancy of these recollections, but it essentially just became another disturbing piece of the story to see how influential G.P and his rules really were to MirandaHe s made me believe them it s the thought of him that makes me feel guilty when I break the rules It was almost expected, however still just as shocking when it becomes glaringly obvious that Miranda slowly begins to take pity on her captor She starts feeling bad for the harsh things she says to him and she also unconsciously prevents herself from doing him excessive harm during an escape attempt as she feels that if she does she s descending to his level It was as if she had simply accepted her situation, and that was the most heartbreaking partAnd yes, he haddignity than I did then and I felt small, mean Always sneering at him, jabbing him, hating him and showing it It was funny, we sat in silence facing each other and I had a feeling I ve had once or twice before, of the most peculiar closeness to him not love or attraction or sympathy in any way But linked destiny Like being shipwrecked on an island a raft together In every way not wanting to be together But together The third and fourth parts of the novel were the most disturbing parts of the entire book Suffice it to say, it gave me goosebumps It was not the ending I had anticipated, but I still felt that the author was successful in creating the everlasting effect I believe he intended Obviously, you understand the severity of Ferdinand s actions however, not until the end do you fully understand just how abnormal he really is This was certainly not a happy book, but one that I m glad to have read and one that I will likely not forget 3.5 stars Thought by some to be the first psychological thriller, this book left me slightly wanting The Collector is broken into three parts The first part is from Clegg s point of view Clegg is a man obsessed with a young woman and decides to collect her, much as he collects butterflies The second part is from the woman s point of view, once she s been collected This was the part that I found unsatisfying There were some observations in this section about class, money and society wh 3.5 stars Thought by some to be the first psychological thriller, this book left me slightly wanting The Collector is broken into three parts The first part is from Clegg s point of view Clegg is a man obsessed with a young woman and decides to collect her, much as he collects butterflies The second part is from the woman s point of view, once she s been collected This was the part that I found unsatisfying There were some observations in this section about class, money and society which probably werepertinent in the 60 s, which is when this book was written , than they are now I found this portion slowed down the pacing considerably The third part goes back to Clegg s point of view.Clegg is where this book lives The peeks inside his mind, while presented as normal thoughts on his part, are truly chilling to us readers who are sane I shivered to read some of the things he was thinking These psychological tics and the detached way in which they were presented were what made this book great You can see how I m torn here between being unsatisfied, while at the same time finding some portions of The Collector to be outstanding To today s jaded horror readers This might not be the book for you But to fans of stories like Silence of the Lambs, or even Red Dragon, I think this book will appeal, even though some of the themes are a bit outdated It s to them that I recommend The Collector One of the first dark psychological thrillers at least in modern times though depending on how you categorize them, James or Poe or even some of the ancient Greeks might usefully be described this way, too A tale of obsession and art and butterflies need I sayWonderful for those who take their fiction black What s especially interesting here is the sheer banality of Frederick s evil He kidnaps Miranda, then doesn t really know what to do or how to relate to her as an actual person One of the first dark psychological thrillers at least in modern times though depending on how you categorize them, James or Poe or even some of the ancient Greeks might usefully be described this way, too A tale of obsession and art and butterflies need I sayWonderful for those who take their fiction black What s especially interesting here is the sheer banality of Frederick s evil He kidnaps Miranda, then doesn t really know what to do or how to relate to her as an actual person instead of as an object


About the Author: John Fowles

John Robert Fowles was born in Leigh on Sea, a small town in Essex He recalled the English suburban culture of the 1930s as oppressively conformist and his family life as intensely conventional Of his childhood, Fowles said I have tried to escape ever since Fowles attended Bedford School, a large boarding school designed to prepare boys for university, from ages 13 to 18 After briefly attending the University of Edinburgh, Fowles began compulsory military service in 1945 with training at Dartmoor, where he spent the next two years World War II ended shortly after his training began so Fowles never came near combat, and by 1947 he had decided that the military life was not for him.Fowles then spent four years at Oxford, where he discovered the writings of the French existentialists In particular he admired Albert Camus and Jean Paul Sartre, whose writings corresponded with his own ideas about conformity and the will of the individual He received a degree in French in 1950 and began to consider a career as a writer.Several teaching jobs followed a year lecturing in English literature at the University of Poitiers, France two years teaching English at Anargyrios College on the Greek island of Spetsai and finally, between 1954 and 1963, teaching English at St Godric s College in London, where he ultimately served as the department head.The time spent in Greece was of great importance to Fowles During his tenure on the island he began to write poetry and to overcome a long time repression about writing Between 1952 and 1960 he wrote several novels but offered none to a publisher, considering them all incomplete in some way and too lengthy.In late 1960 Fowles completed the first draft of The Collector in just four weeks He continued to revise it until the summer of 1962, when he submitted it to a publisher it appeared in the spring of 1963 and was an immediate best seller The critical acclaim and commercial success of the book allowed Fowles to devote all of his time to writing The Aristos, a collection of philosophical thoughts and musings on art, human nature and other subjects, appeared the following year Then in 1965, The Magus drafts of which Fowles had been working on for over a decade was published The most commercially successful of Fowles novels, The French Lieutenant s Woman, appeared in 1969 It resembles a Victorian novel in structure and detail, while pushing the traditional boundaries of narrative in a very modern manner In the 1970s Fowles worked on a variety of literary projects including a series of essays on nature and in 1973 he published a collection of poetry, Poems Daniel Martin, a long and somewhat autobiographical novel spanning over 40 years in the life of a screenwriter, appeared in 1977, along with a revised version of The Magus These were followed by Mantissa 1982 , a fable about a novelist s struggle with his muse and A Maggot 1985 , an 18th century mystery which combines science fiction and history.In addition to The Aristos, Fowles wrote a variety of non fiction pieces including many essays, reviews, and forewords afterwords to other writers novels He also wrote the text for several photographic compilations.From 1968, Fowles lived in the small harbour town of Lyme Regis His interest in the town s local history resulted in his appointment as curator of the Lyme Regis Museum in 1979, a position he filled for a decade Wormholes, a book of essays, was published in May 1998 The first comprehensive biography on Fowles, John Fowles A Life in Two Worlds, was published in 2004, and the first volume of his journals appeared the same year followed recently by volume two.John Fowles passed away on November 5, 2005 after a long illness.


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