eBook Infinity Net: The Autobiography of Yayoi Kusama – Selindameditasyon.com

Infinity Net: The Autobiography of Yayoi Kusama In , encouraged by Georgia O Keeffe, artist Yayoi Kusama left Japan for New York City to become a star By the time she returned to her home country in , she had established herself as a leader of New York s avant garde movement, known for creating happenings and public orgies to protest the Vietnam War and for the polka dots that had become a trademark of her work Her sculptures, videos, paintings, and installations are to this day included in major international exhibitionsAvailable for the first time in English, Infinity Net paints a multilayered portrait of this fascinating artist Taking us from her oppressive childhood in postwar Japan to her present life in the psychiatric hospital where she voluntarily stays and is still productive Kusama s autobiography offers insight into the persona of mental illness that has informed her work While she vibrantly describes the hallucinatory episodes she experiences, her tale is punctuated by stories of her pluck and drive in making her artistic voice heard Conveying the breadth and ambition of her own work, Kusama also offers a dazzling snapshot of s and s New York City and her encounters with its artists she collaborates with Andy Warhol, shares an apartment with Donald Judd, and becomes romantically entangled with Joseph Cornell Replete with the sense of the sheer necessity within an artist to create, Infinity Net is an energetic and juicy page turner that offers a glimpse into Kusama s exhilarating world Question what is the normal amount of times to cry while reading an autobiography, because I think I may have exceeded that amount This was incredible Incredible person, incredible artist, incredible message It reads less like an account of someone s life andlike having a cool conversation with an older relative about their wild life in their 20s, now that you re old enough to understand all the scandalizing stuff they did My only regret is that I read it after seeing her 2017 US retr Question what is the normal amount of times to cry while reading an autobiography, because I think I may have exceeded that amount This was incredible Incredible person, incredible artist, incredible message It reads less like an account of someone s life andlike having a cool conversation with an older relative about their wild life in their 20s, now that you re old enough to understand all the scandalizing stuff they did My only regret is that I read it after seeing her 2017 US retrospective tour and not beforehand It also felt remarkably personal and freeing for someone so casually mention I had to cancel this event because of panic attacks but my friend got lunch with me anyway and to read such an in depth description of what it was like having sex repulsion whether Kusama identifies as ace idk in the middle of the free love movement Kusama s accounts of her hallucination experiences, her depression, and suicidal thoughts were also hard to get through at times, but that says a lot for how honest she was about her own mental health It was freeing, in a way, to hear someone talk about very hard times in their youth and early adulthood and read their words now about how time, life, art are all precious, and they want to live as much as they are able.The whole thing was great When will the award winning biopic be made If you re a fan of Yayoi Kusama, contemporary art, or just strong women in general, this is a great book It has been translated from its original Japanese version, so at times the writing is a bit rigid, but it s straightforward which is enjoyable in its own way, almost like a casual conversation I ve seen a few people on here complain about he self promotion and bragging in the book, which certainly exists, she has moments where she rattles off one award she s won or praise she s received aft If you re a fan of Yayoi Kusama, contemporary art, or just strong women in general, this is a great book It has been translated from its original Japanese version, so at times the writing is a bit rigid, but it s straightforward which is enjoyable in its own way, almost like a casual conversation I ve seen a few people on here complain about he self promotion and bragging in the book, which certainly exists, she has moments where she rattles off one award she s won or praise she s received after another, but I think it s well deserved, and it personally was news to me how acclaimed she is Kusama has always been overshadowed in the art world by male contemporary artists, who she has claimed in previous essays she s written have even ripped her off At the opening of the Claes oldenburg show where he premiered his soft sculpture calendar he allegedly saw her at the opening and said sorry yayoi because he blatantly appropriated her soft sculpture method, and in turn becamefamous than her for it For all she has achieved she should be a household name to the public, up there with Warhol and pollock, yet she s still not So for me, I enjoyed hearing about all her accomplishments, even if it was a tad heavy on the bragging, because I actually wasn t even aware she had such a prolific history I didn t learn about her in art school in any of my art history classes until I took an Asian art history class, despite the fact that she s clearly an international art star, for whatever reason the writing of history seems to be undermining her contributions She talks quite a bit in the book about her up and down relationship with Japan over the years, which I really loved, especially her descriptions of its natural beauty The book focuses mostly on growing up there, her move to NY and the art she made in the 60 s, then for the last few decades she jumps around a bit and it s quite sparse and unbalanced at times In the end I liked it for that reason though because she wrote it in a very natural and instinctual way, only focusing on what she thought was the most important It all felt very personal, conscious, and unrehearsed A really special read A concise and engrossing narrative of the life of one of today s greatest living artists who transformed a psychosomatic illness into art.I was drawn to the work of Yayoi Kusama when I visited one of her Infinity Rooms at the Art Gallery of Ontario recently I picked up her autobiography the same day at the art gallery s gift shop Repetition and Multiplication is her approach, whether it be the mirror balls in the Infinity Room or the multitude of polka dots of her first exhibition in New York A concise and engrossing narrative of the life of one of today s greatest living artists who transformed a psychosomatic illness into art.I was drawn to the work of Yayoi Kusama when I visited one of her Infinity Rooms at the Art Gallery of Ontario recently I picked up her autobiography the same day at the art gallery s gift shop Repetition and Multiplication is her approach, whether it be the mirror balls in the Infinity Room or the multitude of polka dots of her first exhibition in New York in 1959, or the profusion of penises that followed and send her down the road into the sexual revolution of the 60 s and 70 s.Kusama served her time as a starving artist in New York in her early years, living in a garret and eating potatoes, and all the while creating, creating, creating From a young age she could see auras of individuals and heard the voices of animals and plants she saw hallucinations of lights Painting was born out of a fever of desperation to find a cure for her mental state She had a morbid distaste for sex, given that her father was a prolific womanizer, and her mother forced her to follow him and find out what he was up to Create and Obliterate became her mantra create the very thing that revolted her, and create lots of it hence the legion of penises , and thereby cut through the revulsion.Even though the book starts with her arrival and rough beginning in New York, Kusama reveals to us gradually that she was already an upcoming artist in Japan during her early twenties, and through a persistent correspondence with American artists and other financial benefactors, such as Georgia O Keefe, she wound her way to New York in 1957, the place she had always wanted to be Her first exhibition in the Big Apple two years later placed her on the road to success, from which she never deviated Soon, she was exhibiting all over America and Europe, and later evolved into the Happening, a performance art piece performed in the open, where the actors would end up stripping naked and having sex while a fully clothed Kusama would paint polka dots on their bodies This led to brushes with the law, for Kusama s performance art skirted the borders of legal propriety even in the permissive west Given the Vietnam war occurring at the time, flag and bible burnings were introduced into the act, and I wondered how she managed to keep her US visa from being cancelled Unfazed, she ventured into other forms of art publishing, theatre, fashion, clothing, and organized them along business lines She is also liberal in sprinkling the narrative with the many kudos she received from prominent arts figures, that sometimes turns this book into a glory parade.Her ambivalence towards sex is interesting She claims that inasmuch as she arranged orgies for both heterosexuals and homosexuals, she never participated in the act, her childhood fear and loathing of sex being so strong Yet she had a lover in Joseph Cornell, the artist, who himself was a sexual cripple Sex for them was getting naked and sketching each other in their ten year relationship they never had sex Salvador Dali was another close friend.The last half of the book covers her return to Japan in 1973 Now famous and artistically developed, she sees how much Japan s spirituality has been lost in its quest to become an economic superpower Money was chasing culture, there was no investment in developing art, and Japanese artists disparaged each other, whereas elsewhere artists helped each other Her Happenings got busted by the police in Japan She dismisses her home country as a corrupt fourth rate state where the patriarchy is firmly entrenched And yet, when her mental illness began to overcome her, she permanently hospitalized herself in Japan in 1975, and has never left the hospital to this day She built a studio in the hospital to continue her work and launched another phase of her career with single minded focus she became a novelist, short story writer and poet in Japanese in addition to being an artist, and has won many Japanese awards.Today, she is a recluse from the art world, furiously creating at the age of 90, with the clock racing against her Her new subject death An easy to read autobiography that spans across Yayoi s life With some elegant prose and lovely imagery, she details her life as a young Japanese artist making her way in New York I did struggle with her ego in this book, not one for great moments of humility or reflection on how she appeared to treat people As an artist myself, I wanted to knowabout how she used her art as a way to manage her mental instability, and this book almost skimmed across that There are some nice moments in An easy to read autobiography that spans across Yayoi s life With some elegant prose and lovely imagery, she details her life as a young Japanese artist making her way in New York I did struggle with her ego in this book, not one for great moments of humility or reflection on how she appeared to treat people As an artist myself, I wanted to knowabout how she used her art as a way to manage her mental instability, and this book almost skimmed across that There are some nice moments in this story, some insights into the raw mentality she has in approaching work We know she is a big name, so I personally found her name dropping, endless review excerpts and gallery listing pointless and excessive to what she was trying to say

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